Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness Program Hosted by Museum

David Kallenbach

David Kallenbach

The third program of History that Matters: Anniversaries of 2018 features David Kallenbach, executive director for the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness Foundation (ABWF) and his program “The Call of the Wilderness—40 years of the Absaroka-Beartooth.” Sponsored by the Yellowstone Gateway Museum, the free program is held on Wednesday, October 24 at Park Photo, 115 S. Main St., Livingston at 7:00 pm. This is a new venue with space for more chairs and no stairs. Interested parties can sponsor a chair—more information will be given during program.

At 944,000 acres, the “A-B” is the sixth largest wilderness areas in the Lower 48 states, larger than Yosemite National Park and nearly as large as Glacier National Park. Its mountain scenery, rugged beauty, superlative recreational opportunities, pristine natural resources, and vacation-worthy destinations are exceptional. It’s within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem but is relatively unknown and often overlooked.

Mountain Goat and Fossil Lake from Bald Knob

Mountain Goat and Fossil Lake from Bald Knob

Kallenbach is the Executive Director of the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness Foundation, a group founded in 2010 to support stewardship of our backyard wilderness area. He has served in his position with the ABWF since 2012.

Kallenbach grew up in Colorado after falling in love with mountains, hiking, backpacking, and mountain climbing from an early age. His first real job out of college at CU-Boulder was as an Interpretive Park Ranger in various national parks—leading hikes, conducting campfire programs, and educating the public about their protected wild places, something he continues to do in his work with the ABWF. He proudly served as a science teacher in public schools, overseas in the Peace Corps, and at a small liberal arts college.

Kallenbach first came to Montana in 1996 as an instructor for the Outward Bound program based in Red Lodge and Dillon, and has happily lived in Montana ever since. 

The final speaker series program is on Wednesday, November 7. “Crow Fair: Celebrating 100 Years of Apsaålooke Culture” is co-presented by Shane Doyle, educator and member of the Crow (Apsaålooke) Tribe, and John Zumpano, local photographer.

All programs are held at 7:00 pm at Park Photo, 115 S. Main St., Livingston. The speaker series is free, open to the public and refreshments are served. Donations are welcome. Doors will open at 6:30 pm.